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Groovy...

  • is an agile and dynamic language for the Java Virtual Machine
  • builds upon the strengths of Java but has additional power features inspired by languages like Python, Ruby and Smalltalk
  • makes modern programming features available to Java developers with almost-zero learning curve
  • supports Domain-Specific Languages and other compact syntax so your code becomes easy to read and maintain
  • makes writing shell and build scripts easy with its powerful processing primitives, OO abilities and an Ant DSL
  • increases developer productivity by reducing scaffolding code when developing web, GUI, database or console applications
  • simplifies testing by supporting unit testing and mocking out-of-the-box
  • seamlessly integrates with all existing Java classes and libraries
  • compiles straight to Java bytecode so you can use it anywhere you can use Java

Experience the latest Groovy 1.8

Groovy 1.8, the latest major and stable version of the popular dynamic language for the JVM, has been released. To learn more about the novelties, make sure to read the release notes. In a nutshell, Groovy 1.8 provides new Domain-Specific Language authoring capabilities for more readability and expressivity of your business rules, runtime performance improvements, the bundling of the GPars parallel and concurrency library, built-in JSON support, new compile-time meta-programming features (several new useful AST transformations), new functional programming aspects for closures, and much more.




"Groovy is like a super version of Java. It can leverage Java's enterprise capabilities but also has cool productivity features like closures, builders and dynamic typing. If you are a developer, tester or script guru, you have to love Groovy."








Samples

A simple hello world script:

def name='World'; println "Hello $name!"



A more sophisticated version using Object Orientation:

class Greet {
  def name
  Greet(who) { name = who[0].toUpperCase() +
                      who[1..-1] }
  def salute() { println "Hello $name!" }
}

g = new Greet('world')  // create object
g.salute()              // Output "Hello World!"



Leveraging existing Java libraries:

import static org.apache.commons.lang.WordUtils.*

class Greeter extends Greet {
  Greeter(who) { name = capitalize(who) }
}

new Greeter('world').salute()



On the command line:

groovy -e "println 'Hello ' + args[0]" World





Documentation [more]

Getting Started Guide
How to install and begin using Groovy as well as introductory tutorials.

User Guide
Provides information about using the Groovy language including language facilities, libraries and programming guidelines.

Cookbook Examples
Illustrates larger examples of using Groovy in the Wild with a focus on applications or tasks rather than just showing off the features, APIs or modules.

Developer Guide
Contains information mainly of interest to the developers involved in creating Groovy and its supporting modules and tools.

Testing Guide
Contains information of relevance to those writing developer tests or systems and acceptance tests.

Advanced Usage Guide
Covers topics which you don't need to worry about initially when using Groovy but may want to dive into to as you strive for Guru status.

Latest announcements

The Groovy development team is happy to announce the joint releases of the Groovy 2.4.1 and Groovy 2.3.10 of the Groovy programming language for the Java platform.

Both releases are bug fix releases, and while Groovy 2.4.1 is the latest official stable branch, we thought it might be helpful to some projects who are still on the 2.3.x line to get a final release for that branch. But going forward, the 2.3.x branch won’t see any upcoming release.

You can learn more about all the tickets closed by reading:

For reference, you can also read the release notes of Groovy 2.4 if you haven't had a chance to since the announcement.

Head over to the download section of the new Groovy website to download the binary distribution, or update your dependencies accordingly with those new version numbers.

Thanks a lot for all those who contributed to this release!


Groovy 2.4 released

The Groovy team is happy to announce the release of Groovy 2.4.0!

The big highlight of this release is the Android support, which allows developers to write Android applications fully using Groovy, with much less boilerplate code than raw Java.
The team also focused on various improvements in terms of performance, smaller bytecode generation, or memory consumption.
Other interesting aspects worth noticing in this release are:
  • traits can use the @SelfType annotation with static type checking enabled to restrict to what classes traits can be applied
  • GDK methods improvements
  • some refinements to existing AST transformations
  • further Groovysh improvements as well.
Please have a look at the full release notes for Groovy 2.4 to know more about the new features and all the interesting tickets closed.
You can have a look at the 2.4 changelog on the new Groovy website too.
And then, just go grab this release while it's hot!
Thanks a lot to all those who contributed to this release, whether through bug reports, but also with documentation or code contributions through pull requests. All your help is warmly welcome!
Your support of Groovy and its ecosystem is what makes Groovy so strong, and what will allow it to continue making us all more productive for the next decade!
Keep on groovy'ing!




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