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Groovy...

  • is an agile and dynamic language for the Java Virtual Machine
  • builds upon the strengths of Java but has additional power features inspired by languages like Python, Ruby and Smalltalk
  • makes modern programming features available to Java developers with almost-zero learning curve
  • supports Domain-Specific Languages and other compact syntax so your code becomes easy to read and maintain
  • makes writing shell and build scripts easy with its powerful processing primitives, OO abilities and an Ant DSL
  • increases developer productivity by reducing scaffolding code when developing web, GUI, database or console applications
  • simplifies testing by supporting unit testing and mocking out-of-the-box
  • seamlessly integrates with all existing Java classes and libraries
  • compiles straight to Java bytecode so you can use it anywhere you can use Java

Experience Groovy 1.8

Groovy 1.8 is the latest major and stable version of the popular dynamic language for the JVM. To learn more about the novelties, make sure to read the release notes. In a nutshell, Groovy 1.8 provides new Domain-Specific Language authoring capabilities for more readability and expressivity of your business rules, runtime performance improvements, the bundling of the GPars parallel and concurrency library, built-in JSON support, new compile-time meta-programming features (several new useful AST transformations), new functional programming aspects for closures, and much more.


"Groovy is like a super version of Java. It can leverage Java's enterprise capabilities but also has cool productivity features like closures, builders and dynamic typing. If you are a developer, tester or script guru, you have to love Groovy."





Samples

A simple hello world script:

def name='World'; println "Hello $name!"

A more sophisticated version using Object Orientation:

class Greet {
  def name
  Greet(who) { name = who[0].toUpperCase() +
                      who[1..-1] }
  def salute() { println "Hello $name!" }
}

g = new Greet('world')  // create object
g.salute()              // Output "Hello World!"

Leveraging existing Java libraries:

import static org.apache.commons.lang.WordUtils.*

class Greeter extends Greet {
  Greeter(who) { name = capitalize(who) }
}

new Greeter('world').salute()

On the command line:

groovy -e "println 'Hello ' + args[0]" World

Latest news [more]

Groovy 2.3.0 is out

The Groovy development team is proud to announce the final release of Groovy 2.3.0!

 Groovy 2.3 is the new major release of Groovy, featuring official support for running Groovy on JDK 8traits, new and improved AST transformations like @TailRecursive@Builder and @Sortable, a new NIO2 module with Path support, lightening fast JSON parsing and building, closure parameter type inference, a new markup template engine, Groovysh and GroovyConsole ease of use improvements, a new GroovyAssert test utility, more @BaseScript class capabilities, and more.

Please read the Groovy 2.3.0 release notes for further details on all these exciting new features!

You can download Groovy at the usual location.

JIRA will give you the detailed change log for this release.

Groovy wouldn’t be what it is without your support, your bug reports and feature requests, your contributions and pull requests, so big thanks to all those who contributed to this release in a way or another, including the usual suspects of the core team (Jochen, Paul, Cédric and myself), but also André, Andres, Tim, Pascal, Johanes, Paolo, Thibault, Rick and Andrey, Jim (base script class), Damien, Kenneth and several others I’ve forgotten to mention!


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