Kiyokuni Kawachiya. X10: A Programming Language for Multicore Era In IPSJ Magazine, Vol. 52, No. 3, pp. 342-356, in Japanese (2011/03).

http://www.bookpark.ne.jp/cm/ipsj/search.asp?flag=6&keyword=IPSJ-MGN520311&mode=PDF

An external X10 seminar last summer.

Kiyokuni Kawachiya. Programming Language X10 Seminar in PPL Summer School 2010 "New Languages in the Multicore Era" by JSSST SIG Programming and Programming Languages, in Japanese (2010/09/12).

http://ppl.jssst.or.jp/index.php?ss2010e

We are pleased to announce the winner of our X10 Jeopard Contest.  Chris Bunch, a Ph.D. student in computer science at University of California, Santa Barbara, answered all questions correctly.   I had in mind a somewhat different question for this answer:

8. Answer: This computer language could be expressed, in some way, as MULTIPLY concatenated with ADD.

I had in mind "X10" as the answer because the Chinese symbol for "ten" looks much like a plus sign.  However, Chris's response of "X++" is also certainly valid.

Congratulations to Chris!

X10 2.1.2 Released

We're happy to announce that X10 and X10DT version 2.1.2 are now available for download. This release contains a number of bug fixes and improvements to the code base. For more details, please see the X10 2.1.2 release page at http://x10-lang.org/X10+2.1.2+Release.

X10 Jeopardy Contest

You may have seen IBM’s Watson challenge two all-time human Jeopardy champions. Now it is your turn to pit your wits, not against Watson, but against other student experts from around the world regarding the X10 programming language! The winner will receive their choice of an X10 t-shirt or a free workshop registration for the PLDI workshop on X10. (Second place will receive the other prize).

Here is how it works. Below are a set of twelve "answers" Jeopardy-style. The first email received with twelve correct responses will be announced as the winner. The second email received with twelve correct responses will be announced as runner-up.

This contest is not open to IBM employees or contractors. It is open to both graduate and undergraduate students worldwide with an interest in X10. Email your answers to jcthomas@us.ibm.com.

Please remember that in Jeopardy, the "answers" are given to you and you must respond in the form of a "question" that fits with the category. For example, an answer might be "This is the third planet from the sun" and the correct response would be in the form of a question: "What is earth?" Good luck!

Category: X10 innovation award winners around the world.
1. Answer: This innovation award winner has a gemstone translation project.

2. Answer: The university of this Innovation Award winner has a banana slug as a mascot.

3. Answer: This European Innovation Award winner is moving undergraduate courses to X10.

4. Answer: This Innovation Award winner is working on MapReduce.

5. Answer: The work of this Innovation Award winner allows programmers to use Java frameworks.

6. Answer: These two Innovation Award winners are at a university which awarded a Ph.D. degree in mathematics (non-honarary) to an American football quarterback who played for the Cleveland Browns in the 1960’s.
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Category: Play with Numbers, Words and Symbols.

7.Answer: The cost in US dollars of an X10 license times e times pi times Avagadro’s Number.

8. Answer: This computer language could be expressed, in some way, as MULTIPLY concatenated with ADD.

9. Answer: This X10 construct can be found in a place to transform eggs to chicks, a portable firestarter, and the main source of calories in beef.

10. Answer: This X10 construct is intended to introduce a discipline to prevent deadlocks and race conditions.

11. Answer: In this hexadecimal year, an IBM computer beat world chess champion Kasparov.

12. Answer: This Innovation Award winner may make you think of an open German penny.

You may have seen IBM’s Watson challenge two all-time human Jeopardy champions. Now it is your turn to pit your wits, not against Watson, but against other student experts from around the world regarding the X10 programming language! The winner will receive their choice of an X10 t-shirt or a free workshop registration for the PLDI workshop on X10. (Second place will receive the other prize).

Here is how it works. On February 21st, we will post to both the X10 language website and the X10 users group mailing list (around 8 am EST, 1 pm GMT) a set of twelve "questions" Jeopardy-style. The first email received with twelve correct responses will be announced as the winner. The second email received with twelve correct responses will be announced as runner-up.

This contest is not open to IBM employees or contractors. It is open to both graduate and undergraduate students worldwide with an interest in X10. Further instructions will be forthcoming on February 21. When the time comes, email your answers to jcthomas@us.ibm.com.

X10 Workshop at PLDI

X10 workshop at PLDI -- deadline extended to February 18, 2011

The ACM SIGPLAN 2011 X10 Workshop (X10'11) will be co-located with PLDI'11 and held June 4th, 2011 in San Jose, California.
See http://www.x10-lang.org/workshop/ for more details.

The International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE) is the premier software engineering conference, providing a forum for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, experiences and concerns in the field of software engineering.

http://2011.icse-conferences.org/

This conference will be held May 21-28, 2011 in Honolulu.

X10 Day in China

The [X10 Day|X10 Day China] workshop was held on December 4-5, 2010 in Beijing, China.

X10 2.1.1 Released

We're happy to announce that X10 and X10DT version 2.1.1 are now available for download. This release contains a number of bug fixes and improvements to the code base. For more details, please see the X10 2.1.1 release page at http://x10-lang.org/X10+2.1.1+Release.

An Introduction to Programming With X10 is now available.
This is the first part of what will be a more complete guide for programmers with some experience in object oriented programming, such as Java or C++.

We've recently posted a minor update to the X10DT 2.1.0 with a couple of new features and a couple of bug fixes to the downloads page and update site. See the X10DT Installation page for more details.

X10 Splash!

Mike Hind writes:

On Tuesday, Oct 19, 2010, the X10 team hosted a Birds-of-a-Feather
session to a standing room only crowd of over 100 attendees at the
annual SPLASH/OOPSLA conference. The session started with overviews
from Michael Hind, Vijay Saraswat, and Evelyn Duesterwald, who briefly
summarized the project, the language, the tools, and the community
building efforts. This was followed by short presentations by six
members of the X10 community: Jens Palsberg (UCLA), Corky Cartright
(Rice), Tony Hosking (Purdue), Tetsu Soh (University of Tokyo), Eli
Tilevich (Virginia Tech), and Daniel Frampton (Australian National
University), who discussed what they are doing with X10 for curriculum
development, applications, and advanced implementations.

The session concluded with several questions and answers for the X10
team. Many leading researchers were in attendance and many others who
didn't attended expressed regret in the following days of the
conference.

We are especially appreciative to Jens, Corky, Tony, Tetsu, Eli, and
Daniel for helping to ensure the success of this event.

We're happy to announce that X10 and X10DT version 2.1.0 are now available for download. This release contains a number of bug fixes and improvements to the code base. For more details, please see the X10 2.1.0 release page at http://x10-lang.org/X10+2.1.0+Release.

Official alpha release of X10/CUDA

Since many X10 community members have been asking whether X10 will run on the
GPU, as part of the 2.1.0 X10 release we are also releasing our CUDA backend.
This enables fragments of X10 programs to run on CUDA-capable GPUs, allowing
significant speedups. Here are some supported features:

  • Write programs that run on host and GPU using a single language: X10
  • Use existing X10 constructs (async, finish, etc) to represent many CUDA idioms
  • Utilize more than 1 GPU
  • Use a network of hosts, each with 0 or more GPUs
  • Implicitly copy data from host to GPU
  • Static prevention of errors due to accessing GPU memory on the host or vice versa
  • 3 small programs to try out in samples/CUDA
  • Automatic selection of blocks/threads based on particulars of hardware and kernel

Currently using CUDA is only possible with the C++ backend and has only been
tested on x86/x64 Linux with the latest CUDA drivers. X10 must be specially
built from source to use CUDA devices. Please see the X10 2.1.0 CUDA page on the
X10 website for instructions on how to try it out.

http://x10-lang.org/X10+2.1+CUDA

Questions and comments about X10/CUDA are welcome on the x10-users mailing
list.

Note that development of the CUDA release is ongoing in the svn repository. If
you are a member of the community and your appetite has been whet by the CUDA
support in the 2.1.0 release, consider going further and checking out svn. We
have already strengthened the support for CUDA shared memory, and added access
to the CUDA __syncthreads() construct via the X10 clock syntax. We intend to
add more support for CUDA features over the coming weeks.

X10 and X10DT 2.0.6 Released

We're happy to announce that X10 and X10DT version 2.0.6 are now available for download. This release contains a number of bug fixes and improvements to the code base. For more details, please see the X10 2.0.6 release page at http://x10-lang.org/X10+2.0.6+Release.

There will be a BOF at SPLASH in Reno on Tuesday, October 19th from 7 to 8pm.  If you are interested in attending or presenting, send email to

John C Thomas (jcthomas@us.ibm.com)